Charlotte Bellis: safe journey home

Charlotte Bellis can now go home.
the government gives the green light to return home, a flight and quarantine are ready for her.
The pregnant New Zealand journalist, reluctantly helped by the Taliban, can now return home.
Charlotte Bellis, a reporter from New Zealand, was stranded in Afghanistan due to anti-covid restrictions imposed by her country of origin.
Thanks to the strong echo caused by social media and word of mouth, the woman’s case has attracted so much public attention that the New Zealand government has offered an ad hoc quarantine on the first available flight.
A step backward, after the country had refused her permission because of the pandemic.
According to the BBC, Deputy Minister Grant Robertson told reporters during a briefing: “There is a place in managed isolation and quarantine for Mrs. Bellis and I urge you to take it.
but then defended the work of the government which has been exposed to strong criticism over the matter.
words that clash with what Bellis has claimed in recent days, to have sent 59 applications to the New Zealand authorities to obtain an emergency green light, without ever getting a response.
Now the situation seems resolved and seems rather bizarre all this because of a situation, that of the pandemic, difficult to manage, but now livable since 93% of the population is vaccinated and fully adapted to the new social situation that has lived with us for more than two years.
We wish Charlotte a good return home, to take care of her baby on the way, rest, and resumption of work successfully as she has always faced communicating to all of us the best of authoritative information and free as she and very few knew how to do

Charlotte Bellis: an incredible story of rights-denied

an incredible story of denial of one’s rights.
this is the story of a New Zealand al Jazeera journalist who recently became famous for her fight against the Taliban in Afghanistan after the Americans fled to the territory that had been occupied after the 11th of September 2001 well over 20 years ago.
she has always given the news on the piece and informed everyone about the status of women in the Afghan land denigrated by the Taliban.
recently she became pregnant with her partner, also a journalist-photographer for the new york times, and asked the New Zealand authorities to return home to continue the treatment of the pregnancy.
In Doha, Qatar, she could not return because she was not married and was denied a visa.
In Qatar, it is illegal to have children without being married, so she decides to resign from Al Jazeera and return to New Zealand, but the strict anti-covid rules imposed by the government of Jacinda Arden do not allow her to do so.

The only country for which she and her partner have valid visas is Afghanistan, and so she decides to contact the Taliban: “We are happy for you, you can stay here, you won’t have any problems” they reply from Kabul, advising her to report that she is married.
And in case it turns out that she is not, “to call them”.
Everything will be fine, she will be told.
A part of her life spent fighting for the rights of Afghan women, she now finds herself being treated better by those she was fighting for than in her country of origin. The little girl is expected to be born in May.
Who knows if there will be a happy ending on the New Zealand side, given that care for this type of medical situation is scarce in the Afghan land, depredated by the crisis due to social unrest and government.

Hopefully, everything will go well for this journalist called to do her job and denied by a nation of birth of its right to return home to conduct with serenity with her partner the care that she deserves to owe to both her and her child.

good luck, charlotte, we are all on your side for you like millions of New Zealanders around the world for the past two years that been unable to return home due to the rigid, inflexible, and insensitive rules of the New Zealand government.